Thursday, May 26, 2016

INTERVIEW : AN INSPIRING YOUNG NIQABI

 
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Assalamu Aleikum,
This is an interview I had with sister Juwayriyah.She has a blog mashallah and it is very beneficial here is the link to anyone who is interested in reading it: notafragileflower.wordpress.com


Jazakallah for your participation and patience. I hope we all benefit from this wonderful interview. May Allah bless and guide you.


Tell us a little about yourself?

 
I'm an eighteen year old American girl- (not your average one, I'm afraid) Interested in art, writing, reading, and human rights....I lived in Yemen for nearly ten years before returning here and growing up. I wear the niqab, which I guess is pretty unusual, but I'm proud of being unusual. I was homeschooled by my mother and am hoping to get my 'government approved' diploma this year.

What inspired you to wear the niqab?

 
My mother and older sister. I wanted to be just like them when I started wearing it....I remember being so proud when I got my first niqab. Now that I'm older I realize there's more to it than 'being like Ummi' but I feel the same about it.

How old were you when you started wearing the niqab?

Maybe nine? But at that point it wasn't something I had to do. I didn't realize how unusual that was until we came back here.

A lot of people tend to believe that wearing the niqab is a barrier for education, work, and social life. What are your thoughts on this?


As for work and education, I believe anything you can do in khimar you can do in niqab too. It's not seen here so often, of course, but in Yemen doctors and teachers and students all wore the niqab (around men, of course) and no one batted an eye. About social life- often it's up to to you to make people feel comfortable, but once they get that you're just a girl like all the other girls, things are fine.

You live in a Muslim minority country. Is wearing the niqab difficult there?

 
I also live in a practically zero-Muslim area in America! However- surprisingly -not particularly, I don't think. I don't go to school, so I was spared that, and It's usually nothing worse than the occasional ninja remark. You have a consciousness of being different, but it's not that hard for me. I've also learned not to judge people at a glance- some of the unlikeliest people have been the loveliest.

How do you feel when people react negatively towards you wearing the hijab and niqab?

 
Usually it just passes me by. I've gotten used to it......usually the rudest people are cowards and refuse to make eye contact, so it's just kind of pesky. I've never felt physically threatened; however, the most disturbing incident was one man who said he was going to shoot me. It was just a nasty over the shoulder comment, but I think that's the worst I've got. I feel like I belong here too, so they can just keep away if they don't like it.

If someone approaches you asking you why you wear the niqab. How would you respond to them?

 
We are told to cover our beauty to avoid causing or falling into wrong, and this is how I believe is the best way. It also brings us closer to Allah and further from trying to please the people, and I think that is the greatest kind of freedom.

How do you feel you have changed after you started wearing the niqab?


Honestly, I can't pinpoint something exact; it was just such a normal step towards growing up. One thing I can say is people always think I'm older than I am (which is okay for now, but in ten years-) and because my mother taught me to hold my head up and follow my convictions I do earn respect- from others and myself. But since I came here and was forced to defend the step I think it has made me a stronger person- since I got through the doubt and came out on top.

What advice would you give to young muslim women wanting to wear the hijab or niqab but are afraid to do so?


I tell myself that the pleasure of Allah is worth unimaginably more than the pleasure of the people-or yourself- but it's not always that easy. I understand being afraid of scaring people off or even angering your family, and it's not easy. But I think in the end the people who are worth it will accept you- as a person, not a niqab or hijab. I don't want to stand before Allah and have nothing to say- nothing except excuses, which are worth nothing. And since you never know when that will be, don't wait. Also that there are so many of us out there that will offer you strength and a proverbial shoulder to cry on , so if you need help, don't hesitate to ask. We are your sisters.

Tell us more about your blog

Well, I started it because I thought there were too few blogs out there that showed our side of things. Nobody really wants to listen, but if we make enough noise, someone will listen. Everyone wants to weigh in on the niqab debate (not burqa, people!) but too few of us who actually wear it are invited to say what we want the world to hear. I decided to invite myself. I might regret it. It's also about some other things I think need discussion (none of that yet) and poetry which I took the plunge and decided to share and see if I'm really a horrible poet. Oh, and it's called notafragileflower.wordpress.com

The Quran is beautiful, but we always have that one verse which is special to our hearts. What is yours?

I think the ayah I love best is about the believers, when Allah says-
(And when they hear Al Laghw (dirty, false, evil talk) they with draw from it and say- "To us our deeds and to you your deeds. Peace be to you. We seek not the ignorant.") It contains so much grace in it, and too few of us have try to have that grace and peace with other today. My favourite Surah is Surat Yusuf... it's such a truly beautiful story and an example for us all.

Any niqabi incidents you would like to share?


Eating a melting ice cream cone with my squirming babysitting charge on my lap- and his melting ice cream cone in my other hand. Suffice to say, It. Was. A. Disaster. Fortunately I was going home afterwards, not the other way around. I would have been too ashamed to appear in public in that mess! :).. Moral of the story: Don't get two ice cream cones on a hot day, because you won't have a hand to lift your niqab.

Your parting words


Always remember why you're doing something. If you're doing it for Allah, you'll be the winner. 
 

Note: If you would like to be interviewed for our blog, leave us an email on niqablovers@gmail.com and we'll get back to you, In Sha Allah. Sisters only.

8 comments:

  1. Maa shaa Allah. Keep it up. May Allah strengthen you.:)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Check out my niqab tutorial channel. On youtube. Here the link for my last video.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Asalaam alaikum wa rahmatulahi sister. InshaAllah please do some reading in what is proper Hijab and niqab. SubhanAllah it a serious matter to encourage other sisters into beautifying and adorning themselves in public. The images I saw include make up and much face exposure and flashy prints. This is not from the example of the female sahaba. May Allah forgive us and guide us. Aameen

    ReplyDelete
  4. Asalaam alaikum wa rahmatulahi sister. InshaAllah please do some reading in what is proper Hijab and niqab. SubhanAllah it a serious matter to encourage other sisters into beautifying and adorning themselves in public. The images I saw include make up and much face exposure and flashy prints. This is not from the example of the female sahaba. May Allah forgive us and guide us. Aameen

    ReplyDelete
  5. Tks very much for your post.

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